Book Review | Britt-Marie Was Here by Fredrik Backman

I adore Fredrik Backman’s books. I discovered A Man Called Ove a few years ago, and I fell in love with Backman’s writing style and character development. Since then, I have read all of his novels. All I need to do is read his novella, And Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and Longer, and I will be done with all of his works!

I finished Britt-Marie Was Here this week and wow. Backman is a genius when it comes to writing about the human experience. His characters are flawed, but colorful and loveable. There is no such thing as a two-dimensional character. A misunderstood character will have qualities about them that you adore. Backman can also introduce a character briefly on one page, and that character will possess enough emotional depth that they leave a mark when they exit the scene. It’s just truly remarkable. His books have humor, suffering, pain, heartache, romance and humor. They are all masterpieces.

A little more about Britt-Marie Was Here:

Britt-Marie can’t stand mess. A disorganized cutlery drawer ranks high on her list of unforgivable sins. She is not one to judge others—no matter how ill-mannered, unkempt, or morally suspect they might be. It’s just that sometimes people interpret her helpful suggestions as criticisms, which is certainly not her intention. But hidden inside the socially awkward, fussy busybody is a woman who has more imagination, bigger dreams, and a warmer heart that anyone around her realizes.

When Britt-Marie walks out on her cheating husband and has to fend for herself in the miserable backwater town of Borg—of which the kindest thing one can say is that it has a road going through it—she finds work as the caretaker of a soon-to-be demolished recreation center. The fastidious Britt-Marie soon finds herself being drawn into the daily doings of her fellow citizens, an odd assortment of miscreants, drunkards, layabouts. Most alarming of all, she’s given the impossible task of leading the supremely untalented children’s soccer team to victory. In this small town of misfits, can Britt-Marie find a place where she truly belongs?

My thoughts

Readers first meet Britt-Marie in Backman’s My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry. She’s not exactly a likable character…but just you wait. At the end of the book, Britt-Marie has left Kent, her cheating husband, and Britt-Marie Was Here picks up where we left off.

Backman is wonderful at creating main characters that are prickly and annoying, but you eventually grow to absolutely adore them – this is Britt-Marie. Britt-Marie certainly has her quirks. She’s socially awkward and very set in her ways, but a lot like Ove in A Man Called Ove, you learn her backstory and you laugh out loud at their mannerisms and interactions with other folks. You wish you knew them in real life.

Backman is also incredible at creating communities. Borg is a small, washed-out town, but the people who live in the town are tight knit and there for one another. Like the Beartown series, the town is deeply connected to a sport. Britt-Marie finds herself working at a soon-to-be-closed recreational center and then the coach for the soccer team, a sport she knows nothing about. Soccer is what brings the town together, and though the kids aren’t very good and practice on a crappy pitch, the entire town comes to watch them play in the Cup. It is so heartwarming and Backman excels on capturing these moments. Though the town is a mess and its people are “seedy,” they are well-rounded and you grow to like them and defend them.

As I mentioned, Backman has such a talent for writing about life in its most fragile and powerful moments. Here’s an absurdly long excerpt that made me cry:

At a certain age almost all the questions a person asks him or herself are really just about one thing: how should you live your life?

If a human being closes her eyes hard enough and for long enough, she can remember pretty well everything that has made her happy. The fragrance of her mother’s skin at the age of five and how they fled giggling into a porch to get out of a sudden downpour. The cold tip of her father’s nose against her cheek. The consolation of the rough paw of a soft toy that she has refused to let them wash. The sound of waves stealing in over rocks during their last seaside holiday. Applause in a theater. Her sister’s hair, afterwards, carelessly waving in the breeze as they’re walking down the street.

And apart from that? When has she been happy? A few moments. The jangling of keys in the door. The beating of Kent’s heart against the palm of her hands while he lay sleeping. Children’s laughter. The feel of the wind on her balcony. Fragrant tulips. True love.

The first kiss.

A few moments. A human being, any human being at all, has so perishingly few chances to stay right there, to let go of time and fall into the moment. And to love someone without measure. Explode with passion (261).

My favorite part of Britt-Marie Was Here was the ending, because it was just about her and the mark she left on the town. It wasn’t about her marriage with Kent, or any new relationships she formed along the way; it was about her journey and the next steps she took for her own healing and well-being. In the end, she chose herself, and that was beautiful.

Have you read this one? If you’re a Fredrik Backman fan, what book is your favorite?


December Hopefuls

Christmas, Presents, Gifts, Winter, December

Ahh. The holiday season. *wipes tear*

Welcome.

December is a busy time, so I never anticipate that I will read much. There are two books that I do plan to read this month, and they are annual reads.

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

A Christmas Carol

I have reread this book every year around Christmas time for the past 10 years. It’s such a classic, and I love the story (and film adaptations)!

Letters From Father Christmas by J.R.R. Tolkien

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I received this book from a friend last year, and I will be reading it annually. The book is a series of letters that Tolkien wrote his kids while pretending to be Father Christmas. The letters are hilarious, filled with troublesome polar bears and elves and incredible pictures that Tolkien drew himself. Ian and I would read each other a letter every night before bed, and I can’t wait to continue the tradition this year!

What else am I reading?

Glad you asked.

The Poppy War (The Poppy War, #1)

I picked this up last week and flew through the first 130 pages. This book is a historical military fantasy and I was captivated the moment I started. The main character, Rin, is so interesting.

Britt-Marie Was Here

Do I expect to get my heart torn out by Backman yet again? Yes. Will I continue to read his books knowing I will ugly cry, holding my chest and wondering why the world is so cruel and beautiful at the same time? Also yes.

Hoping that I will finish both of these books in January! Who knows — maybe I’ll finish one of these this month!

What are you reading?

And, see what I’ve read so far in 2021!

January Wrap-Up

February Wrap-Up

March Wrap-Up

April Wrap-Up

May to September Wrap-Up

October Wrap-Up

November Wrap-Up

November Wrap-Up

It’s hard to believe that November has already come and gone and we are almost done with 2021.

November was a very successful month for reading; I read 8 books! The past few months I felt really behind on meeting my Goodreads goal of 50 books, but now I have only 2 to go until I complete the challenge!

Here’s what I read in November:

On Becoming Babywise: Giving Your Infant the Gift of Nighttime Sleep by Robert Bucknam and Gary Enzo

On Becoming Babywise: Giving Your Infant the Gift of Nighttime Sleep

As a first-time mom, I will take all and any book recommendations from parent friends. This book was super helpful and provided some great tips on how to help your baby develop a sleep routine. While a lot of the stuff in here was a little dated, I did appreciate their take and will adopt some of their practices into my parenting style.

Vicious by V.E. Schwab

Vicious (Villains, #1)

This book was just alright for me. I was not a fan of Addie LaRue, but many friends encouraged me to try this series out as well as A Darker Shade of Magic. I will not be reading the second in this series, but I plan to give Darker Shades a try in January. The writing is good in this one, but I really didn’t enjoy the story and the characters. I found myself quite bored throughout … even though I read it fast.

The Rose Code by Kate Quinn

The Rose Code

Thank goodness for Kate Quinn. If you are a regular reader of my blog, you will know that The Rose Code is now one of my favorite books of the year. You can read my full thoughts in my book review, but I will share that this book is fast-paced (even though it’s a long one). It is also captivating and profound. This book really delivered, hitting all of my favorite topics: historical fiction, feminism, and (recently) historical romance.

The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern

The Night Circus

… Eh. This book is a little overhyped. I go into more detail in my book review, but my high level thoughts are this: beautiful prose should not be used as a distraction to hide a lackluster plot and flat-as-can-be characters. I found this same issue with Starless Sea, a book that was also overhyped for its beautiful writing. Don’t get me wrong, Morgenstern can write some pretty prose, but when I am sitting there wondering where the “fierce competition” or “deep, magical love story” is, you’ve lost a lot of stars.

There’s No Such Thing as Bad Weather: A Scandinavian Mom’s Secrets for Raising Healthy, Resilient, and Confident Kids (from Friluftsliv to Hygge) by Linda Åkeson McGurk

There's No Such Thing as Bad Weather: A Scandinavian Mom's Secrets for Raising Healthy, Resilient, and Confident Kids (from Friluftsliv to Hygge)

This is another good parenting book that I highly recommend. While I skimmed through a lot of the personal stories (there were just too many), I appreciated the author’s take on getting kids outside and the importance of exposing your children (and yourself, really) to fresh air at an early age. My husband and I read this one together and we found so many useful nuggets that we will adopt with our little one.

Zen Mamas by Teresa Palmer and Sarah Wright Olsen

Zen Mamas

Another parenting book, but this one was OK. It got a little too earthy crunchy at some parts, but I did appreciate their insight and learned a lot about what kind of mom I want to be!

The Lions of Fifth Avenue by Fiona Davis

The Lions of Fifth Avenue

Boy. I really, really wanted to love this book. The premise was right up my alley: historical fiction, libraries, feminism … but instead I encountered a poorly written book that was lacking in insightful dialogue, likable characters, and plot development. Gosh, this was just not good. The characters were flat, the prose was choppy and messy. Cringy dialogue and a stupid whodunnit at the end. Predictable twists and turns. Just an all-around stinker.

The Deal of a Lifetime by Fredrik Backman

The Deal of a Lifetime

When in doubt, turn to Backman. After I finished the book above, I went right to my favorite author. I started Britt-Marie Was Here and then read this novella in one sitting. This 60-ish page novella was absolutely breaktaking. Like all of Backman’s work, I was left speechless and in tears after his brilliant writing tore my soul apart. This is a great holiday read that teaches you about the importance of family and living every moment to the fullest.

What did you read in November? Share some books below!

And, see what I’ve been reading this year:

January Wrap-Up

February Wrap-Up

March Wrap-Up

April Wrap-Up

May to September Wrap-Up

October Wrap-Up

November Hopefuls

Ahh, November. One of my favorite months. Not only is it my birthday month, but autumn is in full swing. Leaves are fully peaked and falling, the weather is crisp, and you get to pack on layers of cozy sweaters and drink hot beverages all day.

I love Thanksgiving and I love preparing for the holidays, so, November is really where it’s at.

In November, I love to dive back into my favorite genres: historical fiction and fantasy. I like to read big, chunky books during the winter months. I love cozying up in my nook with a cup of tea and getting lost in a story. I have two months left to meet my Goodreads goal, and I have some PLANS.

Let’s get to November:

Vicious (Villains #1) by V.E. Schwab

Vicious (Villains, #1)

I read The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue last year and did not enjoy it, but readers have encouraged me to give her Villains and Darker Shades of Magic series a try, so here I am! I am about 30% through this one already and it is definitely intriguing. Excited to see what comes out of it.

The Rose Code by Kate Quinn

The Rose Code

I really enjoyed The Alice Network and look forward to reading Quinn’s latest book, The Rose Code. I’ve seen some great reviews on bookstagram for this one. This one is THICK, but I always fly through historical fiction books. The Rose Code is about three women who broke German military codes during the war and how they are torn apart by a series of events.

Vengeful (Villains #2) by V.E. Schwab

Vengeful (Villains, #2)

If all goes well with Vicious, I will be picking up the second book in Schwab’s Villains series (I believe a third one is in the works!)

Night Road by Kristin Hannah

Night Road

Another Kristin Hannah. This one I plan on reading via audiobook. Knowing Hannah, I will make sure the tissues are nearby.

The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern

The Night Circus

Now this one I am looking forward to! I read The Starless Sea this year and wasn’t a fan, but readers informed me this one is breathtaking. I also read that Morgenstern wrote this book during NaNoWriMo, which I will be participating in this year! I have this one in paperback and audio, so I will most likely do a mix and match with this book.

The Lions of Fifth Avenue by Fiona Davis

The Lions of Fifth Avenue

The cover alone has me interested, but give me a historical fiction about public libraries, suffrage, feminism … I am HERE for it.


What are you reading this month? Have any of these made it on to your list?

And, see what I’ve read so far in 2021!

January Wrap-Up

February Wrap-Up

March Wrap-Up

April Wrap-Up

May to September Wrap-Up

October Wrap-Up